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Top 9 Best Kerosene Heater On The Market 2019 Reviews

So, let’s start this in-depth review by getting straight to it with some background information…

Which Type Of Kerosene Heater Is Best For You?

The world of kerosene heaters has two parts, heavy duty, and general use. Let’s look at what makes them different and how that applies to your choices.

Heavy-Duty Kerosene Heaters

When we think of heavy-duty use, we are talking about contractors, builders, and groups of people working in big open spaces in challenging cold conditions.

In heavy-duty applications, we tend to use forced air high-output models that some folks like to call “torpedo heaters.” They are like small jet engines that really crank out a lot of heat and with considerable force. They require electricity to operate correctly.

best kerosene heater

In the winter, we see crews use them when pouring and curing concrete projects, shipyard gangs involved in steel fabrication, pipeline teams crossing wilderness areas to complete projects, large warehouse-sized buildings, home builders, and other scenarios where being exposed to hostile elements is part of the job.

It would be absurd, and extremely dangerous to bring one of these into a home. It is a disaster waiting to happen. There are excellent home use heaters for that, and we will look at them too.

General Use Kerosene Heaters

We just went through the heavy-duty kerosene heaters, and let’s be clear, some of the smaller units we will be discussing are also awesome for construction site applications.

But, these units do not use forced air or extreme output characteristics. They are smaller and designed to stand quietly, delivering clean, reliable heat for extended periods, and without the need for electricity-forced air systems.

Radiant vs. Convective Heaters

A candle is a good example of a convective heater. There is a flame, and the heat rises from it. An old-fashioned oil lamp is an even better example. Lamp oil saturates a wick, and it is ignited and adjusted to an optimum burning level.

Most convective kerosene heaters are round, and meant to be placed in the center of a room for “all around” warming.

A radiant heater also uses kerosene and a wick, but is made to operate inside a metal grid to capture the heat, glow cherry red, and the heat is more effective and easily directed. These units are often rectangular, with one open side, so they can be placed near a wall, and the heat will come out the front.

The radiant kerosene heaters are a more effective heat source to direct the heat to the desired location.

Why Should Everyone Own A Kerosene Heater?

It is obvious that folks interested in kerosene heaters live in cold climates, and some of them are extreme. For readers who regularly go through our reviews, you probably have read one of our favorite bits of advice, “People do not plan to fail, they fail to plan.

Ok. Let’s do an emergency drill. It is midnight (why do emergencies always seem to wait until midnight? You are laughing because it’s true!)

Ok, so it is midnight, it is 5 degrees below freezing, the power is out, and your heating system relies on electricity to operate. How will you keep your family warm? How will you stop your pipes from freezing?

Thank your lucky stars…

This is when you thank your lucky stars you invested in a high quality and reliable general-purpose kerosene heater.

If you have a round convection heater, you can fire it up without electricity, place it in the center of the room, and be a hero for sure! You may want to put one in the basement to keep the pipes from freezing too! No manufacturer is going to tell you to use this for cooking, but the fact is, a LOT of heat comes from these units, and they can boil water, heat up cans of beans, and fry an egg.

kerosene heater

Your radiant kerosene heater also operates without electricity, can be used to heat your home or basement, and save you from living in a frozen house until the power is restored. They are especially handy because they can be a bit more out of the way and not dominate the whole room. The heat comes out the front, not the top, and is great if you need to direct the heat in a more focused manner.

Are we being crazy to think a kerosene heater is a must have?

There are really only two types of people when it comes to emergencies. Ready, and not ready.

We had a home in Maine, and during one of our epic ice storms, we lost power for six days and nights. Six days. No power. Below freezing and blowing 40 MPH.

We were completely ready with enough food, water, flashlights, and yes, kerosene heaters to keep the basement and house warm as toast. In our opinion, you only get one chance to be ready for a crisis like this.

It is worth noting that many people use these to heat homes and garages daily, in none emergency applications. In some regions, these compare very favorably to an electric baseboard heater on a dollar per hour basis.

Pro Tips For Using Kerosene Heaters

Safety First

All kerosene heaters share one common feature; they are all using fire to do their job.

Fire requires oxygen to burn, and we require oxygen to survive. See the problem?

ALWAYS make sure the area where kerosene heaters are used is well ventilated. If you are using one to heat your home, be sure to crack a few windows open at least 1 or 2 inches to get fresh air.

Since there is a danger of an accumulation of carbon monoxide, adding a detector alarm is an excellent addition to your home or work area!

How To Avoid That Kerosene Smell?

Most people think that a kerosene heater produces foul smells. Actually, once the heater is up to temperature and properly tuned, there are just about zero odors!

What does smell, is the fuel, so be careful to only fill the tank to the manufacturer suggested level. The fill line allows the fuel to heat up and expand. Overfilling will create a stinky spill for sure!

When possible, some users report that it is ideal to take the unit outside and burn it for about ten minutes to get all the parts up to temperature and burning at 100% efficiency. Then, turn the unit off, and take it inside for a nice clean restart.

When you first get your heater, it is coated with factory oils and residue. Fill it with fuel, allow time for those units with wicks to absorb the fuel, and then run it for 30 minutes outdoors or a very well-ventilated area. This will hold down the “first burn” smell a lot.

The Most Important Part Of Kerosene Heaters

The most important safety control when dealing with kerosene heaters is nestled firmly between your ears. We are dealing with fire, so we need to use our brains and common sense.

Keep your kerosene heater away from furniture, drapes, carpets, and anything else that is flammable. Keep the heater out of walkways and areas where people can trip over them. Follow the instructions, do not overfill the tank, and check for leaks while using.

kerosene heater review

When you get a new kerosene heater or replace a wick, allow about an hour to ensure the fuel has completely saturated the wick. This will make for an easy start, less smell, and greatly increase the life of the wicking element.

Don’t Mix These Things Together!

We are referring to children, pets, and poisonous fuel. The National Fire Protection Association tells us that most kerosene heater-related accidents come from children being poisoned by ingesting kerosene.

Water contamination is the real enemy of kerosene heater efficiency, so always use fresh, clean fuel.

How To Store Kerosene?

The one thing we never want to do is to put even the smallest quantity of gasoline in a kerosene heater. Kerosene needs to be stored in a blue container, with the word “Kerosene” written in big, bold letters.

On job sites, it is vital that workers understand that red cans are gasoline, blue cans are kerosene, and each has a terrible outcome when put in the wrong device.

We used to keep all fuels locked in a cage, and only a supervisor could get to them. That solved many potential problems!

So, are you ready to see our top choices for the best kerosene heaters available?

Best Kerosene Heater For The Money 2019 Reviews


1 Mr. Heater F270320 MH125KTR Contractor 125,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater

Here is the 800-pound gorilla in our kerosene heater study. It pumps out an amazing 125,000-BTU per hour, which can heat up 30,000+ square feet of well-ventilated space in a very short period of time. And, it’s easy to unpack, assemble, and move around, courtesy of a nice pair of rubber tires.

It is quite versatile for use in construction since it burns fuel used in common construction equipment. The Mr. Heater F270320 can burn kerosene 1, kerosene 2, diesel 1, diesel 2, home heating oil, and JP-8.

The tank holds 8 1/2 gallons and can operate about 9 1/2 hours on a full tank. Since the fuel tank has a good fuel gauge, it is easy to monitor consumption and know when a refill is due.

Oversized controls…

We like the split upper shell designed for maintenance and the oversized controls to make it easy to operate while wearing gloves.

While the unit is powered by an enclosed motor and continuous ignition system to hold down the noise as much as possible, it will have a jet engine sounds at higher temperature settings. We found the noise level to be acceptable, considering the massive volume of heat it is pumping out.

Surprisingly cool to the touch…

The adjustable temperature control thermostat allows for a wide range of heat output. Even when running at full blast, the unit is surprisingly cool to the touch, which is a great feature.

Mr. Heater F270320 has good built-in safety features like an overheat safety shutdown and a photo CAD cell. (An “eye” that detects flame and stops pumping oil into the combustion chamber if flame ignition is unsuccessful.)

Mr. Heater F270320 MH125KTR Contractor

125,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater

BTU per Hour125,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)3,125
Tank Capacity (Min)8.5 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatYes
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)9 1/2 hours
Length39 3/4 inches
Width18 1/4 inches
Warranty1 Year Limited
Mr. Heater F270320 MH125KTR Contractor 125,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater
Our rating:4.2 out of 5 stars (4.2 / 5)

Pros
  • High-quality construction.
  • Very high BTU output.
  • Good operating time on a full tank.
  • Split shell design for easy maintenance.
  • Nice size of pneumatic rubber tires, easy to move.
  • Operates on a wide variety of fuels.
Cons
  • No Safety Tip-Over Switch.
  • Needs a power source to operate.

2 Mr. Heater F270270 MH75KTR Contractor 75,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater

We took a look at the Mr. Heater F270320 125,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater, and this is its little brother. It pumps out a respectable 75,000-BTU per hour, which can heat up 1,875 square feet of well-ventilated space in a very short period of time.

It’s also easy to unpack, assemble, and is ready to go in a short set up time. And it is quite versatile for use in construction since it burns fuel used in common construction equipment. The Mr. Heater F270270 can burn kerosene 1, kerosene 2, diesel 1, diesel 2, home heating oil, and JP-8.

11 hours on a full tank…

The tank holds 6 gallons and can operate about 11 hours on a full tank. Since the fuel tank has a good fuel gauge, it is easy to monitor consumption and know when a refill is due. We particularly like the split upper shell designed for maintenance and long product life.

The unit is powered by an enclosed motor and continuous ignition system to hold down the noise. We found the noise level to be acceptable, considering the volume of heat it is pumping out. The adjustable temperature control thermostat allows for a wide range of heat output. Even when running at full blast, the unit is surprisingly cool to the touch, which is a great feature.

Detects a flame or not as the case may be…

Mr. Heater F270270 has good built-in safety features like an overheat safety shutdown and a photo CAD cell. (An “eye” that detects flame and stops pumping oil into the combustion chamber if flame ignition is unsuccessful.)

Mr. Heater F270270 MH75KTR Contractor

75,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater

BTU per Hour75,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)1,875
Tank Capacity (Min)6 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatYes
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)11 hours
Length32 1/4 inches
Width14 inches
Warranty1 Year Limited
Mr. Heater F270270 MH75KTR Contractor 75,000-BTU Forced-Air Kerosene Heater
Our rating:4.2 out of 5 stars (4.2 / 5)

Pros
  • High-quality construction.
  • High BTU output.
  • Excellent operating time on a full tank.
  • Split shell design for easy maintenance.
  • Operates on a wide variety of fuels.
Cons
  • No Safety Tip-Over Switch.
  • Needs a power source to operate.

3 Dyna-Glo KFA50DGD 50,000 BTU Kerosene Forced Air Heater

The 50,000 BTU per minute range is very popular for heating up workshops and moderate size construction sites. The manufacturer feels that up to 1,200 square feet can be kept up to temperature with this model.

The 14 hour run time is impressive, especially considering it will do that on 5 gallons of fuel. The unit is hand carry, and easily portable, and comes out of the box pretty much ready to use.

While this unit is rated to burn a wide range of fuels, the manufacture suggests burning K-1 Kerosene to ensure a low smoke, pure flame, and a much longer useful life for the product.

Dyna-Glo KFA50DGD 50,000 BTU Kerosene Forced Air Heater
BTU per Hour50,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)1,200
Tank Capacity (Min)5 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatYes
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)14 hours
Length32 inches
Width13 3/4 inches
Dyna-Glo KFA50DGD 50,000 BTU Kerosene Forced Air Heater
Our rating:3.9 out of 5 stars (3.9 / 5)

Pros
  • Good BTU output.
  • Excellent operating time on a full tank.
  • Features Auxiliary power source piggyback cord.
Cons
  • Failure to ignite due to poor igniter placement.
  • Tends to leak on restarts.
  • Poor customer reviews with similar complaints about quality and performance.
  • No Safety Tip-Over Switch.
  • Needs a power source to operate.

4 Sengoku HeatMate 10,000-BTU Portable Indoor/Outdoor Radiant Kerosene Heater, HMN-110

Semgoku is a Japanese company who have been making heaters for about 60 years, and are known for their high-quality products. Most folks don’t know it, but kerosene heaters are the most common form of home heating elements in Japan.

Before we look at the features and specifications of this heater, there is something to consider, not just with this brand, but others. Established brands have strong websites and support. This creates long-term customer satisfaction because when you need a new wick, replacement part, a look at the instruction manual, or an excellent tutorial on how to change a wick, websites like Semgoku really are a refreshing value add.

Only requires fuel and batteries to operate…

This compact radiant kerosene heater only requires fuel and batteries to operate. Obviously, this is ideal in emergency situations, or places that have no access to power (I am looking at you hunters, fishermen, and the DIY crowd.)

Heaters like the Sengoku HeatMate also saves on heating bills, because it is ideal for heating the rooms people really use, not the whole house all day and night. As we pointed out previously, radiant heaters deliver a more stable and directional type of heat and can be put out of the way, since only the front opening throws out the heat.

Just right for home use…

At 10,000 BTU per hour, it is really just right for home use, and for job sites where extra heat in a workspace would be welcomed. Home users will also love the cartridge tank design, which allows users to carry the tank outdoors for refills, and carry the clean and dry tank back to the unit.

One thing that really brought a smile was the fact that the unit comes delivered with batteries and a manual siphon to help get the fuel into the unit with no spills or drama. Nice touch guys!

Let’s look at some specifications for the Sengoku HeatMate 10,000 BTU heater…

Sengoku HeatMate 10,000-BTU

Portable Indoor/Outdoor Radiant Kerosene Heater, HMN-110

BTU per Hour10,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)380
Tank Capacity (Min)1.2 Gallon
Electricity RequiredNo
Heat TypeRadiant
IgnitionPush Button Electric
ThermostatNo
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchYes
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel Type1-K Kerosene
Operating time (Full Tank)15 hours
Weight22 Pounds
Length19.7 inches
Width18.5 inches
Height12.2
Bi-lingual (English/Spanish) Package and ManualsYes
Cartridge tank for remote fuelingYes
Siphon Pump & Batteries IncludedYes
Sengoku HeatMate 10,000-BTU Portable Indoor/Outdoor Radiant Kerosene Heater, HMN-110
Our rating:4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)

Pros
  • Reputable company.
  • Quality components.
  • Good BTU output.
  • Excellent operating time on a full tank.
  • Delivered with batteries and siphon hose.
Cons
  • A bit complicated to change the wick.

5 Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7 Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, Ivory

We find the 10,000 BYU per hour heaters are really an ideal size for many general users. They are good in emergencies and can hold down winter heating costs by allowing users to only heat the area they will be using. If you are going to settle in and watch the game on a snowy Sunday, why heat the whole darn house?

This unit is of good quality and value, and very little assembly is required. The side handles for carrying are a nice touch. Speaking of touch, it is amazing how cool the whole unit stays while delivering steady radiant heat from the front.

The push on, push off buttons are clearly marked and easy to use…

People who buy kerosene heaters need to read and follow the instructions carefully, and not take shortcuts. If you follow the instructions, do the cleaning and maintenance, store the unit property, you should get years of service from this type of kerosene heater.

Much like the Semgoku Heatmate we just reviewed, we think it is great that the Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7 comes ready to go with batteries and a manual siphon hose for the fuel. The tank is also removed for filling, which allows users to do the fill up outside to keep the smell away. It is critical to only use fresh and clean 1-K Kerosene to ensure safe, clean, and effective flame quality.

So let’s look under the hood and see what this unit is made of…

Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7

Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, Ivory

BTU per Hour10,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)500
Tank Capacity (Min)1 Gallon
Electricity RequiredNo
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionPush Button Electric
ThermostatNo
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchYes
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel Type1-K Kerosene
Operating time (Full Tank)12 hours
Weight25 Pounds
Length12 inches
Width22 inches
Height19.3
Cartridge tank for remote fuelingYes
Siphon Pump & Batteries IncludedYes
Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7 Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, Ivory
Our rating:3.6 out of 5 stars (3.6 / 5)

Pros
  • Reputable company.
  • Quality components.
  • Good BTU output.
  • Excellent operating time on a full tank.
  • Delivered with batteries and siphon hose.
Cons
  • A bit complicated to change the wick.
  • Some components are on the cheap side.

6 Pro-Temp PT-70-SS 70,000 Btu Kerosene Radiant Sun Stream Heater, L, Red/Black

Pro-Temp Radiant Sun Stream Heater is really the best of two worlds. It is a highly efficient air driven system that relies on a nozzle to atomize the fuel mixture, send it into the combustion chamber, then through a high-quality ceramic burner housing that functions as a radiant heat sink. In other words, it is a torpedo heater with a radiant heat component.

This unit is rated for outdoor use, or large well-ventilated construction areas, warehouses, and workshops.

Grateful for the heat…

We have spent many hours working in the bone-chilling cold on the coast of Maine, surrounded by the jet engine roar of open-ended torpedo heaters. Grateful for the heat, tired of the constant noise. We, therefore, love the Pro-Temp Radiant Sun Stream Heater because it delivers monster heat and incredibly clean and relatively quiet operation.

Many brands claim to burn a wide variety of fuel, but the one we saw came out of the box and ran on diesel without any smoke, smell, or change in performance.

Never by unplugging it…

Like all heaters, it is critical to read all of the instructions, and in particular, the portion that instructs users to shut off the unit with the switch, and never by unplugging it. With so much heat going through the system, the unit requires about 5 to 10 minutes to complete a cool down cycle.

The good news is, that because it is a radiant heat system, it is still putting out meaningful heat while cooling the internal components down.

As we said, this is the best of two worlds and an awesome combination of two effective thermal strategies.

So let’s take a look at the specifications of the Pro-Temp Radiant Sun Stream…

Pro-Temp PT-70-SS 70,000 Btu Kerosene

Radiant Sun Stream Heater, L, Red/Black

BTU per Hour70,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)2,000
Tank Capacity (Min)4 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeRadiant Combination
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatNo
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Error Indicator LightYes
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)6 hours
Weight28 Pounds
Length20.9 inches
Width14.6 inches
Height21.7 inches
Pro-Temp PT-70-SS 70,000 Btu Kerosene Radiant Sun Stream Heater, L, Red/Black
Our rating:3.7 out of 5 stars (3.7 / 5)

Pros
  • 50% more quiet than comparable torpedo style heater.
  • Effective marriage of radiant and forced air systems.
  • Reputable company.
  • Quality components.
  • Awesome BTU per hour output.
  • Versatile because of the way heat is distributed.
Cons
  • 6 hours is a short operating time.
  • Low fuel capacity.
  • Uses have to always use the switch to enable cool down cycle.
  • No self-regulating thermostat.

7 Pro-Temp PT-70T-KFA 70,000 BTU Forced Air Kerosene Heater, Red/Black

Here is another excellent product from Pro-Temp. We find the 70,000 BTU per minute class of heaters are in the sweet spot for heavy duty users. They are capable of heating 1,875 square feet of well-ventilated shop, barn, warehouse space and run at about 1/2 gallon per hour.

This unit holds 5 gallons of fuel, so to stay on the conservative side, let’s say it will run for about 9 hours.

The “secret sauce”…

Most companies like to brag that their heaters can burn diesel, but this unit really can. The “secret sauce” in this unit is the addition of a factory-installed pressure gauge. The ability to access the pressure adjustment screws, and see the actual pressure readout allows users to use different fuel sources, and tune the burner pressure to ensure optimum atomization of the fuel.

We cannot stress enough how important this one additional feature is. It takes out all the guesswork and extends the hours of operation that are clean and effective.

Runs itself with no problem at all…

The built-in thermostat is reliable, so the unit will turn itself off when the desired temperature is achieved, and later in the day, fire back up when the temperature falls too low.

Like most torpedo heaters, it has a pretty respectable roar when blasting all that heat, but should provide that heat with little odor or drama, especially when running on fresh, clean 1-K Kerosene.

Pro-Temp PT-70T-KFA 70,000 BTU

Forced Air Kerosene Heater, Red/Black

BTU per Hour70,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)1,875
Tank Capacity (Min)5 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatYes
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Error Indicator LightYes
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)9 hours
Weight28 Pounds
Length30 inches
Width12 inches
Height15 inches
Pro-Temp PT-70T-KFA 70,000 BTU Forced Air Kerosene Heater, Red/Black
Our rating:4.2 out of 5 stars (4.2 / 5)

Pros
  • Includes pressure gauge.
  • Easy access to pressure control adjusting screws.
  • Effective self-regulating thermostat.
  • Reputable company.
  • Quality components.
  • Great BTU per hour output.
Cons
  • Requires electricity to operate.
  • Wish it burned a little longer than 9 hours.

8 BE Pressure HK070F 70000 BTU Kerosene/Diesel Forced Air Heater, 120V

Here is another very good member of the 70,000 BTU per minute class of heaters. This unit is easily capable of heating 1,700 square feet of barn, well-ventilated shop, and warehouse space. This unit holds 5 gallons of fuel and will run for about 9 hours.

This unit includes a factory-installed pressure gauge. And, the ability to access the pressure adjustment screws, and see the true pressure readout allows users to use different fuel sources, and also tune the burner pressure ensuring optimum atomization of the fuel.

This feature takes out all the guesswork out of running the heater and extends its hours of operation.

The thermostat is reliable; therefore, the unit will turn itself off when the desired temperature is achieved, and fire back up when the temperature falls too low.

Like most torpedo heaters, it can get loud delivering that amount of heat, but regardless, it does not have much odor or smoke, especially when it is run on fresh, clean 1-K Kerosene.

BE Pressure HK070F 70000 BTU

Kerosene/Diesel Forced Air Heater, 120V

BTU per Hour70,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)1,700
Tank Capacity (Min)5 Gallon
Electricity RequiredYes
Heat TypeForced Air
IgnitionContinuous
ThermostatYes
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Fuel TypeKerosene, JP8, #1 Diesel, #2 Diesel

#1 Fuel Oil, #2 Fuel Oil

Operating time (Full Tank)8 hours
Weight28 Pounds
Length30 inches
Width12 inches
Height15 inches
BE Pressure HK070F 70000 BTU Kerosene/Diesel Forced Air Heater, 120V
Our rating:3.7 out of 5 stars (3.7 / 5)

Pros
  • Includes pressure gauge.
  • Effective self-regulating thermostat.
  • Quality components.
  • Great BTU per hour output.
Cons
  • Requires electricity to operate.
  • 8-hour burn time.

9 Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Kerosene Convection Heater, 23000 BTU, Black

We find the 23,000 BYU per hour heaters are really an ideal size for many general users. They can hold down winter heating costs by allowing users to only heat the area they will be using. People in small homes can expect this to really help hold down heating costs and save the day in emergencies.

Folks with workshops, cabins, RV’s, and barns will really appreciate keeping their places cozy and warm. This unit is also good quality and value, and very little assembly is required.

And, on the plus side, the push on, push off buttons are clearly marked and easy to use.

People who buy kerosene heaters need to follow the provided instructions carefully, and not take shortcuts. If you follow the instructions, do a little cleaning and maintenance, and store the unit property, you should get many years of service from this kerosene heater.

We think it is great that the Dyna-Glo comes ready to go with batteries and a little easy assembly.

Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7

Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, Ivory

BTU per Hour23,000
Heating Area (Sq. Ft)1,000
Tank Capacity (Min)1 Gallon
Electricity RequiredNo
Heat TypeConvection
IgnitionPush Button Electric
ThermostatNo
High Limit Safety Shut-off (HLS)Yes
Safety Tip-Over SwitchNo
Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS)No
Fuel Type1-K Kerosene
Operating time (Full Tank)11 hours
Weight25 Pounds
Length17.5 inches
Height27 inches
Batteries IncludedYes
Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Kerosene Convection Heater, 23000 BTU, Black
Our rating:4.1 out of 5 stars (4.1 / 5)

Pros
  • Reputable company.
  • Quality components.
  • Good BTU output.
  • Excellent operating time on a full tank.
  • Batteries included.
Cons
  • A bit complicated to change the wick.
  • Some components on the cheap side.

Which Of These Is The “Hot” Deal? i.e., What’s The Best Kerosene Heater?

We hope that you have read and enjoyed this entire review. Because you now know that there are large industrial sized heaters, midsize multi-use heaters, and smaller home and small shop heaters to choose from. There are large torpedo heaters that require an electrical outlet to operate and other smaller units that use batteries to start up.

Even in the smaller units, there are convection heaters made to sit in the middle of the room, or radiant heaters that can sit close to walls and project heat out in one direction.

best kerosene heater reviews

Pick the right unit…

We think that once you have established the size of the space you need to heat, factored in the required ventilation, and how many hours you will actually be turning the heater on, you will be able to read our review and pick the right unit.

That being said, if someone said, “I will send you one of the heaters you reviewed for free right now, which will you choose?” Then we do have one unit we would love to own.

And that would be the…

We live in a very cold region and work outside all year round, and in our basement workshop. This makes us realize that the engines in our vehicles and equipment suffer greatly during cold starts on subfreezing mornings. We know in ice storms and days without power, we will need to have a dependable heat source to avoid frozen pipes and general misery.

The Pro-Temp PT-70-SS 70,000 Btu Kerosene Radiant Sun Stream Heater is the “best of both worlds.”

It has the brute force and high BTU per hour output of a torpedo heater, and the efficient and effective heat distribution qualities of a radiant heater.

And there’s more…

It is 50% quieter than a torpedo heater, and this model is known for its ability to run many types of fuel efficiently. We took ours out of the box, assembled it, filled it with diesel, and fired it up. It pumped out a lot of heat and had no smoke or smell.

Besides taking this to job sites, heating our basement (which heats the whole house), we would love to be a hero and bring this to football tailgate parties, hunting and fishing trips, and other outdoor fun activities with groups of people.

That being said, we invite you to read all the reviews, think about what you really need in the way of localized heat sources, and choose the heater that works best for you.

On a final note, large or small, forced air, convection or radiant, we do encourage folks who live in Northern regions to get a kerosene heater, learn how to use it, and keep it ready for emergencies.

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